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Sunday, January 31, 2010

a s roma football team

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united vs a s roma
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Between Mori Girl and Lolita, Unruly plays on ingénue and gothic backgrounds

Written by Valerie Fujita
Pictures from Palm Magazine by Kuluri

I was looking at the dozens and dozens of magazines that I possessed, and I was wondering which pictures, which styling I would choose. Mori Girl is really a hot style right now and since I’ve been touched by it when I arrived one year and a half ago, I sometimes felt the style was a bit light for me. Then, I found that report back in my magazines pool, in Palm Wonderland (edited by Charmworld). I particularly liked the direction of the shooting and the styling and make-up on that report.


To talk about the shooting first: it appeared to me to give a taste of Lolita (although Mori Girl fashion is not to be confused with Lolita fashion, see the Mori Girl rules here); I felt the girl had something about Vladimir Nabokov’s novel heroin, a strange lunar teenager. The shooting is beautifully managed, with a young Lolita looking like model, and there is definitely something weird pointing.

The make-up, on the contrary of Mori Girl make-up is not light: the skin complexion keeps the pale peachy color but the make-up general look is closer to a gothic taste, with largely darkened eyes leads and pale lips. The uses of black make-up and some black and gothic taste accessories (notice the huge cross and the umbrella) are giving another dimension to the Mori Girl look.



I also particularly liked the extremely naturally looking like dry flowers handmade necklaces and hair accessories by m.soeur (created in April 2006). In French, m.soeur means “sister” as the brand concept wants to give the idea that the accessories would be like something handmade by a sister. The concept also wants to concentrate on the idea of the impression of a soft world. They are created from classical views, from flowers and nuts image, into something new and original. Tones remain of course natural. Accessories from m.soeur would cost you between 4 000 to 10 000 yens. You can easily find them at Bulle de Savon, a brand that has already proved a tremendous success with Mori Girls.

How the Blobfish was created

(In heaven)Jesus: Look daddy! Look what I made!God: ....that's...wonderful. What is it son?Jesus: It's a fish!God: Oh, how lovely. That's a wonderful first try. Why don't you put that in the bottom of the sea and try not make too many of them?Check out "The World's Most Miserable Looking Fish" that is apparently facing extinction after being caught in fishing nets around Australia. Isn't it

Of Short Films and Cultural Activities

Friday was a very different weekend for me. I'm used to going out, spending a lot of money in different places in return for a sore throat and a hangover. Instead, I headed to the The Substation theatre at Amoy St for a free viewing of various nominated films in Singapore's Short Film Festival. Apart from a few pretentious oddballs (subjective opinion, I realize this), most of the films were

Saturday, January 30, 2010

roger clemens

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Is Depression Undertreated?

Neuroskeptic readers will be familiar with the idea that too many people are being treated for mental illness. But not everyone agrees. Many people argue that common mental illnesses, such as depression, are undertreated. Take, for example, a paper just out in the esteemed Archives of General Psychiatry: Depression Care in the United States: Too Little for Too Few.

The authors looked at the results of three large (total N=15,762) surveys designed to measure the prevalence of mental illness in American adults. I've described how these surveys are conducted before: they took a randomly selected representative sample of Americans, and asked them a standardized series of questions (the CIDI interview) about their mood and emotions, in order to try to diagnose mental illness. The interviewers, while trained, were not clinicians.

What did they find? The rate of people experiencing Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), as defined in DSM-IV, in the past year, was 8.3%. When they examined ethnicity, this ranged from 6.7% in African Americans to 11.8% in Puerto Ricans. The average severity of the depression was roughly the same in all ethnic groups.

Of those with MDD, 51% reported that they'd had treatment in the past year, either antidepressants, psychotherapy, or both. This ranged from 53% for Whites down to just 29% of Caribbean Blacks and 33% of Mexican Americans. Therapy was somewhat more popular than drugs in all ethnic groups, although a lot of people used both. However, few of the treatments were classed as "guideline-concordant", i.e. long enough to do any good, which they defined as
use of an antidepressant for at least 60 days with supervision by a psychiatrist, or other prescribing clinician, for at least 4 visits in the past year. For psychotherapy...having at least 4 visits to a mental health professional in the past year lasting on average for at least 30 minutes each.
Only 21% of depressed people were getting such treatment, even though these strike me as very lenient guidelines, especially in the case of psychotherapy - how much good is 2 hours per year doing to do?

*

So depression's undertreated, especially in minorities. Too little, for too few. But this rests on an assumption: that we should treat Major Depressive Disorder.

That might not seem like an assumption, but assumptions generally don't. It seems like common sense, almost a tautology - it's a disorder, of course we should treat it! Yet it's not so simple. DSM-IV criteria for MDD require you to have 5 or more out of a list of 9 symptoms, including either depressed mood or a loss of interest in activities, lasting at least 2 weeks, and causing significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

Fair enough. That's quite useful as a way of ensuring that psychiatrists in different countries are talking about the same thing when they talk about depression. But to think that depression is undertreated because only half of people meeting DSM-IV criteria for Major Depressive Disorder are being treated, is to put absolute faith in DSM-IV as a guide to who to treat. This is not what the DSM was meant to be, and there's no evidence it works for that purpose.

Is it really true that people with 5 symptoms need help, and those with 4 don't? Why not 6, or all 9? Why 2 weeks - why not 3 weeks, or 3 months? It's not as if there are loads of studies showing that treating people who have 5 symptoms for 2 weeks, and not treating people who don't, is the best strategy. I'm not aware of any such research. In particular, there's no evidence that people from the general population who meet these criteria when interviewed, but don't seek treatment, would all benefit from treatment as opposed to being left alone. Certainly some would, but they may be a minority.

This is not to say that any other criteria would be better than DSM-IV as guides to treatment, or that there is anything identifiably wrong with the DSM-IV criteria (although there is evidence that antidepressants are not useful in people with relatively "mild" MDD). The point is that doctors don't strictly apply textbook criteria when diagnosing and treating mental illness; they also use clinical judgement.

I don't know any psychiatrist who would prescribe treatment for someone solely on the basis that they met DSM-IV criteria for MDD. They would also want to know about the severity of the symptoms, whether they're related to any stresses or life events, how far they're "out of character" for that individual, etc. In general, they would deploy their training and experience to try to judge whether this person would benefit from treatment. This is why the DSM-IV carries a cautionary statement that "The proper use of these criteria requires specialized clinical training that provides both a body of knowledge and clinical skills."

So, it's far from clear that we should be treating everyone who answers interview questions in such a way that they meet DSM-IV criteria for Major Depressive Disorder. That's an assumption.

This isn't to say that everyone who needs depression treatment gets it. Sadly, there are many sufferers who would benefit from help and don't get any, or don't get it as early as they should. We need to do more to help such people. In this respect, depression is undertreated, although it's hard to know the extent of the problem. Yet it's quite possible that depression is also overtreated at the same time.

H/T Thanks to The Neurocritic for drawing my attention to this paper.

ResearchBlogging.orgGonzalez, H., Vega, W., Williams, D., Tarraf, W., West, B., & Neighbors, H. (2010). Depression Care in the United States: Too Little for Too Few Archives of General Psychiatry, 67 (1), 37-46 DOI: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2009.168

Friday, January 29, 2010

Be Spotted In A Mughal Court - PH

PhotoHunt theme : Spotted

guests enjoying themselves 

I was given a sneak peek of the upcoming blockbuster exhibition called Treasury of the World at the Asian Civilisations Museum on Thursday night. This is its first time in Asia after visiting prestigious museums like the Louvre in Paris and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

an exhilarating dance

Guests got to dress up in Mughal costumes and try a henna tattoo. We were entertained by traditional ethnic Indian dancers who also taught several guests some Indian dance movements. :D

ECL spotted learning Indian dance from the performers

I'm very fascinated with Indian culture and am looking forward to this exhibition where a stunning collection of more than 400 exquisite jewelled works of art - from household items to ornate necklaces and ceremonial swords - from the glorious era of Mughal-ruled India will be displayed.


You can also learn about life in the Mughal court, from leisure pursuits to food and weaponry of the royal family. Gain a fascinating insight to the diverse techniques in the jewelled arts used by the artisans and craftsmen during this period.

Treasury of the World (12 February - 27 June 2010)
Jewelled Arts of India in the Age of the Mughals
Asian Civilisations Museum

5 pairs of tickets to the Treasury of the World exhibition up for grabs!

Question : Where will the Treasury of the World exhibition be held?


Please email your answer together with your name, identification number and contact number to me. Contest ends 7th February 2010.









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