.:[Double Click To][Close]:.

Sunday, February 28, 2010

This spring, let's all become white angels!

Image source: Fudge (pictures by Junichiro Tokumasu)

White, white, again... And still white! On girls with virginal features, whether they are adepts of rock style with printed t-shirt, Lolitas in corset, Mori Girl in white one-piece dress and a wise little knit; at home for cocooning, in a simple apparel, in the street to go to a White Decadance party maybe; in laces, cotton, using ribbons, dots and multiple accessories. And be dressed in all white, is like a dusty and cozy dream, whose heroine looks like an angel, don’t you think?


While winter is long, coats, parkas and other scarves are yet warmly wrapping us up, we begin to languish of a spring where we all come out with a firm step (white, all white, you have to be at ease with this idea) in our immaculate clothes, and make it definitely something attractive to the pedestrians on our roads, who will turn on our angels silhouettes. But simply wearing white is not all. We'll have to customize the style, giving it a personality, whether pop, rock, or just simple and pretty. We are proposing to dissect 3 silhouettes which fit remarkably well (and maybe strangely remarkably for some) to the concept of being an angel.

Mori Girl fashion fans will probably have no problem in recognizing themselves in that color for it is the original color of the Mori Girl silhouette. Girls paying attention to their economies will inevitably end up at Wonder Rocket to find their one-piece dress (between 3 000 and 5 000 yens). But girls looking for beautiful materials and cuts that fall well, catchy details and perfect finishes won’t hesitate to investigate Unruly collection (distributed at Fur Fur and Parco City) spending a little more comfortable budget (about 25 000 yens as an average price for a dress). However, as Japanese one-piece are quite loose, many of them based on a short silhouette with straps, girls will add stockings (remember that Mori Girls don’t often show their skin), and a cardigan, which color would be associated to the shoes color, for the final particular touch.


Lolitas, however often Gothic - which induces in our Western point of view a false idea of a black silhouette - will know how to embellish the white silhouette base with anything that appeals to Lolita styling. And this time, they will not hesitate to play the total immaculate look. They will necessarily jump into a corset to strengthen the size and maintain the stature steady. They will button the blouse to the very top, a cameo to complete the outfit would be a nice idea (to probably be found on the internet, among Toe Cocotte treasures, the shop owned by Rose de Reficul from the Dark Märchen Show). They will pile up laces; a Jane Marple bolero for instance will require you to spend 35 000 yens. And laces, in details, will once again cover legs. Shoes may be flat but, they will remain necessarily round toes. A bag in a shape of an animal will complete the Lolita mood; have a look at H. Naoto looking gothic animal creations, or, our suggestion, order a bag in the shape of a stuffed animal to Lienstuffed… Watch out, Lien’s creations are done by the expert hands of the designer: 100% Made in Japan, everything has a price! Chantilly had also already made some white propositions in 2008, at Laforet Fashion Show in Paris; girls will spend between 20 000 and 25 000 yens for a dress that can be found at the Atelier Pierrot for about 30 000 yens.

London addicts and their punk taste also will look forward to make that radical choice. And then, they will cheerfully add any punk accessories in a happy mess. The skirt is necessarily a vintage one; a white skirt will easily be found in vintage shops in Shimokitazawa for about 5 000 yens. But if you want to play the Queen of Punk, you will certainly invest more than 20 000 yens a huge tutu (a real dancer one)… Why don’t you have a look then at Cabaret? Of course, punk girls can relieve a bit thanks to the prices of the accessories that can be found between 1 000 and 3 000 yens each, in Kera shops, or in the small backstreets by Takeshita dori. We must also think over a pair of flat toes shoes. Doc Martens as a classic, but Quilp (Journal Standard) offers some interesting choice.

Author: Valerie Fujita

wayne gretzky

wayne gretzly
wayne gretzky
wayne gretzky
wayne gretzky
wayne gretzky
wayne gretzky

wayne gretzky

wayne gretzly
wayne gretzky
wayne gretzky
wayne gretzky
wayne gretzky
wayne gretzky

Something to make you laugh

Completely unrelated to travel, but some really important and inspiring words from one of the funniest people around."For me the most important thing is to live your life with integrity, and to not give in to peer pressure to be something that you're not; to live your life as an honest and compassionate person; to contribute in some way.""Follow your passion, stay true to yourself, never follow

Saturday, February 27, 2010

ashley cole

ashley cole
ashley cole
ashley cole
ashley cole
ashley cole
ashley cole
ashley cole
ashley cole

ashley cole

ashley cole
ashley cole
ashley cole
ashley cole
ashley cole
ashley cole
ashley cole
ashley cole

The Decline and Fall of the Cannabinoid Antagonists

Cannabinoid Receptor, Type 1 (CB1) antagonists were supposed to be the next big thing.

They're weight loss drugs, and with obesity rates rising and the diet craze showing no signs of abating, that's a large and growing market (...sorry). They worked, at least in the short term, and they were at least as effective as existing pills. They may even have had health benefits over and above promoting weight loss, such as improving blood fat and sugar levels through metabolic effects.

It all started off well. Rimonabant, manufactured by Sanofi, was the first CB1 antagonist to become available for human use: it hit the European market in 2006, as Acomplia. Four large clinical trials showed convincingly that it helped people lose weight. Rival drug companies were hard at work developing other CB1 antagonists, and inverse agonists (similar, but even more potent). The "bants" included Merck's taranabant, Pfizer's otenabant, and more.

Even more excitingly, there were indications that CB1 antagonists could do more than help people lose weight: they might also be useful in helping people quit smoking, alcohol or drugs. The animal evidence that CB1 antagonists did this was strong. Human trials were underway. Optimists saw rimonabant and related drugs as offering something unprecedented: self-control in a pill, abstinence on demand.

*

But it ended in tears, literally. Rimonabant was pulled from the European market in late 2008; it was never approved in the USA at all. After rimonabant was withdrawn, drug companies abandoned the development of other CB1 antagonists.

The problem was that they made people depressed. In several large clinical trials of rimonabant it raised the risk of suffering depression and other psychiatric problems, like anxiety and irritability, compared to placebo. The reported rates of these symptoms ranged from a few % up to over 40% depending upon the population, but there have been no trials (except very small ones) in which these effects weren't seen. This means that CB1 antagonists cause depression rather more consistently than antidepressants treat it.

Merck have just released the data from a trial of taranabant: A clinical trial assessing the safety and efficacy of taranabant, a CB1R inverse agonist, in obese and overweight patients. It makes a fitting epitaph to the CB1 antagonists. They gave taranabant, at a range of doses, or placebo, to overweight people to go alongside diet and exercise to help them lose weight. The results were extremely similar to those seen with rimonabant; the drug worked:

But there were side effects. Alongside things like nausea, vomiting, and sweating, about 35% of people taking high doses of taranabant reported "psychiatric disorders". 20% of people on placebo also did, so this is not quite as bad as it first appears, but it's still striking, especially since a number of people on high doses of taranabant reported suicidal thoughts or behaviours...

Suicidal ideation was reported in three patients in the taranabant 6-mg group in year 1 and in one patient in the 4-mg group in year 2. There was one suicide attempt reported in a patient with a previous history of suicide attempts in the 6/2-mg group while the patient was receiving 2-mg, and one episode of suicidal behavior reported in a patient in the 6/2-mg group while the patient was receiving 6-mg. There were no completed suicides. The adjudication of possibly suicide-related adverse experiences during years 1 and 2 indicated an increased incidence of suicidality in the taranabant groups...
This is the kind of thing that gives drug companies nightmares, especially today, in the post-SSRI lawsuits era. This is why rimonabant was removed from the EU market in 2008 and why it was never approved in the US.

*

Safety concerns have plagued weight loss medications for decades. The problem is not that they don't work: plenty of drugs cause weight loss, at least for as long as you keep taking them. But unfortunately, there's always a 'but'.

Fenfluramine worked, but it caused heart valve defects, and was banned. Sibutramine works, but it's just been suspended from the European market due to concerns over heart disease (a different kind). Amphetamine-like stimulants such as phentermine work, but they're addictive and liable to abuse. What with rimonabant and sibutramine are gone, the only weight-loss drug approved for use in Europe is orlistat, which seems to be safe, but has some very unpleasant side effects...

Still, CB1 antagonists have a unique mechanism of action: they block the CB1 receptor, which is what gets activated by the cannabinoid ingredients in marijuana, and also the brain's own cannabinoids neurotransmitters
(endocannabinoids). The past five years has seen a huge amount of research showing that the CB1 receptor is involved in everything from memory and emotion to motivation, pain sensation and hormone secretion. We recently learned that there are even CB1 receptors on the tongue that regulate taste.

CB1 is able to do all this because it's found almost everywhere in the brain. To simplify, but only a little, the endocannabinoid system is a general feedback mechanism, which allows cells on the receiving end of neural transmission to "talk back" to the neuron sending them signals; if they're receiving lots of input, they tell the cell sending the signals to quiet down. In other words, endocannabinoids regulate the release of just about every other neurotransmitter. To be honest, given how important the system is in the brain, it's surprising that depression and anxiety are the biggest problems with CB1 antagonists.

For all that, we still don't know why they cause psychiatric symptoms, although a number of mechanisms have been suggested. Hopefully, someone will work this out sooner or later, since that would add an important piece to the puzzle of what goes on in the brain during depression...

ResearchBlogging.orgAronne, L., Tonstad, S., Moreno, M., Gantz, I., Erondu, N., Suryawanshi, S., Molony, C., Sieberts, S., Nayee, J., Meehan, A., Shapiro, D., Heymsfield, S., Kaufman, K., & Amatruda, J. (2010). A clinical trial assessing the safety and efficacy of taranabant, a CB1R inverse agonist, in obese and overweight patients: a high-dose study International Journal of Obesity DOI: 10.1038/ijo.2010.21

Friday, February 26, 2010

arango football player

arango
arango
arango football player
arango partner
arango
arango

arango football player

arango
arango
arango football player
arango partner
arango
arango

[100 Lolitas & Gothic Lolitas Testimonies Week] 4 - MissHermess, Malaysia


How and when did you discover Lolita and Gothic Lolita fashion? I discovered about Lolita fashion when I was 14 years old, from a comic magazine I used to buy. They had a feature on the fashion one day, and a few months later I spied a Lolita dress for sale in a shop and the rest is history.

Could you tell us what are your favorite brands and why? Can you find them easily?
I love Baby The Stars Shine Bright, Alice and The Pirates, Victorian Maiden and Mary Magdalene because I love Classic Lolita and Pirate Lolita the most. I also love the lace used by Baby The Stars Shine Bright. It's just simply gorgeous. Baby The Stars Shine Bright and Alice and The Pirates, I can order it online, but for Victorian Maiden is hard to find because they don't ship overseas.

How did you feel when you bought your first Lolita outfit? How did you feel when you first wore it? Which brand was it?
I felt incredibly happy when I bought my first Lolita outfit, I couldn't stop smiling the entire day! *laughs* Wearing it made me feel like a princess. I can't really remember well what brand it was from, but I think it was from K-Star (1).


What is the type of reaction when people see you dressed up in Lolita clothing? Your friends? People in the street?
People on the street just stare at me or laugh and giggle behind my back when they see me, but some would come up to me and tell me that I'm cute. They'd also ask why I'm dressed up this way. As for my friends, some of them think it's weird but they don't really mind.

Do you see any difference in the way that Japanese girls and western girls wear Lolita?
I can't really comment on this since I'm an Asian, not a western person (2).

Do you think the fact that now Western girls wear Lolita fashion will change the way Japanese Lolita fashion designers think and create?
I think they'd change the sizes of the dresses definitely, since Western girls tend to wear bigger sizes than the Japanese girls, but other than that I don't think their ideas will be affected.

Do you think that Europe or United States, or any other foreign countries are now ready to see Lolita Fashion invade their streets?
No, not yet. They still need more time to slowly embrace the fashion, especially in my country.


Do you think there is a best way to spread Lolita fashion?
I think they best way to do it would be to wear it out on the streets for people to see and teach them about it.

Would you like to see some specialized magazines translated in your own language? Would you like a new magazine issued and produced in your own language and focusing on Lolita fashion in your country?
Yes, definitely!

Is there any Lolita community (ies) in your country? Could you list them and their website address?
Yes, we have one called Yume Miru Alice.

Do you have any message to worldwide Lolitas?
Let's keep the Lolita spirit alive! Aza aza fighting

(1) K-Star is what is called in Japanese a "copy brand", as Bodyline is. These copy brands get the inspiration directly from Japanese Lolita brands, copying their creations, their prints. They are usually "brands" from China.

(2) we didn’t think about it, but as the market has been growing outside of Japan, not only the United-States of America or Europe - and particularly France and Germany - has now been influenced but also some countries in Asia, like Hong Kong, Taiwan, Malaysia, have seen a small but existing Lolita fashion market opening and has been influenced by Japanese gothic vision.

Thursday, February 25, 2010

Hills to Climb Daily - PH

PhotoHunt theme : Daily

After my surgery, what used to be simple tasks have turned into difficult or impossible ones. I need help when showering; I need crutches when walking or climbing stairs. I can no longer go out on my own as there are too many obstacles and not enough facilities for the wheelchair bound.   

I used to go for daily walks to the beach near my house. It takes me only 10 minutes to stroll to this beautiful beach. Now that I'm on wheelchair, it takes me almost an hour because I need to navigate round  barriers, treacherous traffic, uneven pedestrian walks and tricky slopes.

A person on wheelchair will not be able to go down this slope on her own.

As we moved cautiously down the slope, with my husband holding on tight to my wheelchair, the thought of him letting go just to claim my insurance money kept flashing across my mind. Accidents can happen. :P


The climb up the slope was worse but nothing was worst than cyclists speeding down the slope on their bicycles. 


Despite numerous signs banning cyclists from riding in the underground tunnel and a fine of S$1000, the cylists (young and elderly) are boldly breaking the rule.


When my husband reminded a cyclist who was speeding down the slope that there is a S$1000 fine, he braked to hurled vulgarities at us and challenged my husband to a fight. And the man was elderly and spoke good English!  Education and more than 6 decades of living on this earth has been wasted on him as it does not make him a better man. ish.






First Commenter - Tekkaus